blackmagicalgirlmisandry

cisnormative terminology that needs to stop

trans-carlos:

airagorncharda:

"female/male bodied": 

  • I’m a man, this is my body. It doesn’t matter what I was assigned at birth, this is my body and I am a man, and therefore this body is a man’s body, and therefore a male body
  • this is erasure of intersex people
  • this is erasure of nonbinary people
  • you don’t actually give a shit about gender, you’re asking about genitals, and unless you’re a doctor it’s none of your fucking business
  • and if you ARE a doctor, you need to figure your shit out so you don’t alienate your trans* patients and make them less likely to seek medical help due to dysphoria
  • the term you’re looking for is "assigned female/male at birth" or "afab/amab"

"born a man/woman" (also "used to be a woman/man"):

  • trans* people weren’t born cis people and then turned trans; just because it takes us a while to figure out who we are doesn’t mean we were ever somebody else
  • society is cisnormative, and lies to people, and pretends that trans* identities don’t exist and aren’t valid, telling trans* people that they are cis over and over again since birth like a mantra, so trans* people internalize that and believe it, until the evidence to the contrary piles up so high they can’t deny it anymore. That evidence has been piling up since birth; trans* people were never cis people
  • this is erasure of intersex people
  • this is erasure of nonbinary people
  • using these terms incorrectly makes it impossible to use them correctly for nonbinary people who DO identify as having started out as one thing and changed to something else
  • the term you’re looking for is “raised as a man/woman”

"male/female parts/genitalia":

  • again, I’m a man, these are my parts, therefor they are male parts, everybody needs to get the fuck over it
  • Yes, I have breasts and that gives me dysphoria and I want them removed, THANKS FOR REMINDING ME, but they are male breasts
  • Yes I have a vagina. Again, this gives me dysphoria, you are an asshole for reminding me. Again, it is a male vagina since I am a man
  • this is erasure of intersex people
  • this is erasure of nonbinary people
  • Unless you are a doctor my genitals are none of your fucking business
  • If you ARE a doctor, you need to start using medical terminology right now, because you’re a medical professional so I think you can use the word “penis” and “vagina” without melting like the Wicked Witch of the West
  • Doctors using this kind of incorrect terminology are alienating their trans* patients and making them less likely to seek medical help due to dysphoria. Trans* people already have ENOUGH trouble with getting medical help, don’t fuck it up more
  • the term you’re looking for is "penis/vagina/uterus/genitals" or "testes/ovaries" or (and this one’s easy) "chest"

"female/male hormones":

  • cis men and cis women BOTH have estrogen and progesterone and testosterone. Intersex people have all of these hormones naturally as well
  • there are cis women who have high levels of testosterone and low levels of estrogen and progesterone, and there are cis men with high levels of estrogen and progesterone and low levels of testosterone
  • these hormones are not specific to one sex or another, and DEFINITELY not specific to one gender or another
  • this term is hurtful not only to trans* people but also people with pcos, people who are undergoing or have gone through menopause, and other medical causes for variations in hormone levels
  • this is erasure of intersex people
  • this is erasure of nonbinary people
  • the terms you are looking for, shockingly enough, are "estrogen" "progesterone" and “testosterone”

(╯◎皿◎)╯︵ ┻━┻

All cis followers please read this.

metztlixochitl

metztlixochitl:

super-mangos:

Well, I finally finished up my GoFundMe page. I went yesterday to my surgeon for a consultation and the cost will be about 6,000 dollars. :) Please, any amount of donation will help or even spreading this! 

Please help support my best friend’s top surgery!!
bellahijadelaluna
indiedynamo:

scienceyoucanlove:

Tony Hansberry II was a ninth-grader. The new sewing technique he has developed helps to to reduce the risk of complications and simplifies the hysterectomy procedure for less seasoned surgeons.His goal is to attend medical school and become a neurosurgeon. For Tony, it all began in school. He attends Darnell-Cookman School of the Medical Arts, a medical magnet school for middle and high schoolstudents. As part of its integrated medical curriculum, students receive medical instruction, but are also exposed to medical professionals who demonstrate advanced surgical techniques with specialized equipment. His lead medical teacher, Angela TenBroeck, told the Florida Times-Union that Hansberry is a typical student, but is way ahead of his classmates when it comes to surgical skills “I would put him up against a first year medical student. He is an outstanding young man,” she said.During his summer break, Tony volunteered at the University of Florida’s Center for Simulation Education and Safety Research (CSESaR) at Shands Jacksonville Hospital. He was supervised by Dr. Brent Siebel, a urogynecologist, and Bruce Nappi, the administrative director. Together they worked with Tony exploring the mannequins and simulation equipment that physicians and nurses use in training. He became quite interested in invasive surgery and using laparoscopic instruments. As the story goes, one day an obstetrics and gynecology professor asked the group to help him figure out why no one was using a particular surgical device, called an endostitch for hysterectomy suturing procedures. This long medical device has clamps on the end, but Tony used the instrument in a new way allowing for vertical suturing, instead of the traditional horizontal method. After two days, Tony had perfected and tested his new technique. He soon developed a science fair project comparing the suturing times of the vertical endostitch closures vs the horizontal closures using a conventional needle driver instrument.His results showed he was able to stitch three times faster using this new method. Use of this inventive technique may lead to shorter surgical times and improved patient treatment. Found on http://www.oshpd.ca.gov/

through 
Neurons want food

Black Excellence.

indiedynamo:

scienceyoucanlove:

Tony Hansberry II was a ninth-grader. The new sewing technique he has developed helps to to reduce the risk of complications and simplifies the hysterectomy procedure for less seasoned surgeons.

His goal is to attend medical school and become a neurosurgeon. For Tony, it all began in school. He attends Darnell-Cookman School of the Medical Arts, a medical magnet school for middle and high schoolstudents. As part of its integrated medical curriculum, students receive medical instruction, but are also exposed to medical professionals who demonstrate advanced surgical techniques with specialized equipment. His lead medical teacher, Angela TenBroeck, told the Florida Times-Union that Hansberry is a typical student, but is way ahead of his classmates when it comes to surgical skills “I would put him up against a first year medical student. He is an outstanding young man,” she said.

During his summer break, Tony volunteered at the University of Florida’s Center for Simulation Education and Safety Research (CSESaR) at Shands Jacksonville Hospital. He was supervised by Dr. Brent Siebel, a urogynecologist, and Bruce Nappi, the administrative director. Together they worked with Tony exploring the mannequins and simulation equipment that physicians and nurses use in training. He became quite interested in invasive surgery and using laparoscopic instruments. As the story goes, one day an obstetrics and gynecology professor asked the group to help him figure out why no one was using a particular surgical device, called an endostitch for hysterectomy suturing procedures. This long medical device has clamps on the end, but Tony used the instrument in a new way allowing for vertical suturing, instead of the traditional horizontal method. After two days, Tony had perfected and tested his new technique. He soon developed a science fair project comparing the suturing times of the vertical endostitch closures vs the horizontal closures using a conventional needle driver instrument.

His results showed he was able to stitch three times faster using this new method. Use of this inventive technique may lead to shorter surgical times and improved patient treatment. 

Found on http://www.oshpd.ca.gov/
through 

Neurons want food

Black Excellence.